Stages of a Landscape Painting


 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
“Drovers” in stages. Comments are embedded in the captions of the enlarged photos.

 

This was painted near Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, New Mexico which was one of the locations for the motion picture “City Slickers”. The multi-colored cliffs can be seen in the film.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Above the Chama” in stages. Comments are embedded in the captions of the enlarged photos.

"Above the Chama", 22" x 30". Oil on gessoed masonite

“Above the Chama”, 22″ x 30″. Oil on gessoed masonite

reference

Backup photographs. Useless for color but of some limited value for shapes and patterns.

reference photo

Backup photographs. Useless for color but of some limited value for shapes and patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Campsite at Banner Peak”

 

Campsite - final

CAMPSITE at BANNER PEAK, finished painting. I added my Australian Shepherd, Whalley, who appears in many of my paintings.

How “Campsite” came about was a group of artist and I rode horses high into the Sierras to camp and paint. Using a daylight painting of mine from that experience, I transposed it to night values and color from my imagination. My teacher, Frank Reilly, taught various light conditions including night values and colors. I chose an upright shape to accentuate the upward thrust of the mountain. I used a daylight photograph of a horseman I had taken a few years earlier in California at another location.

I found a line drawing of a tent with a shape I liked. Imagining what the tent might look like in these circumstances, I added the light source using spectrum painting. My friend, Paul Strisik had learned about spectrum painting at the Art Students League from Frank Vincent DuMond and passed it on to me. The idea is that when light darkens it moves through the spectrum from warm white to yellow, yellow-red, red and them to red-purple if you choose to go that far. In this instance I stopped at red. Then I added another figure and eventually my Australian Shepherd, Whalley, who seems to appear in many of my paintings.

 

“Santa Maria Della Salute”

This is one of a series of large studio paintings, 36 inches high and 6 feet 8 inches wide begun at the end of 2010. For reference material, I had three paintings I had done on location in Venice and five photographs showing Venetian boats and the Grand Canal as seen from the Acadamia bridge.

“Santa Maria Della Salute”, Oil 36″ x 6ft 8in